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Core Rules

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Championship Formula Racing is simulation of the highest levels of international open-wheel racing from the driver’s perspective. You can play the base game with anywhere from 2 to 6 drivers. With additional driver components the game itself can support up to 12 drivers. A race will typically take between 30 to 45 minutes per lap or 45 to 60 minutes per lap if your field is larger than 6 drivers. Perhaps a little less on a shorter track or with fewer drivers. Players of Championship Formula Racing are often referred to as a drivers in these rules.

The rules below are meant to cover 80% of what you need to know to race. Rules for situations that do not occur all of the time or require a bit more explanation are saved for the back of this book and referenced where needed.

Game Set-Up

Track Selection

Select a track to race on and place that track’s board in the middle of the playing area.

Monaco is a good track for your first race because it is short, straight forward, and can reward a number of different strategies. A one lap race is recommended for your first race.

Determine the Number of Laps

As a rule of thumb, each lap will take around an hour to complete assuming a full field and your race steward is familiar with the rules. A general recommendation is to try between two to four laps.

Hand Out Equipment

Each driver should grab the following:

  • a plastic car
  • a corresponding deck of car set-up cards
  • a deck of speed cards

Select a Race Steward (optional)

Having a race steward is not required, but can help keep things moving especially when there are a lot of drivers. Usually, the most experienced player is assigned the role of race steward. The race steward is responsible for keeping the game moving along, helping people with their moves and the rules, and adjudicating any debates about the rules.

Car Set-Up

Before each race, drivers have an opportunity to set-up their car by selecting values for 6 different attributes: acceleration, deceleration, top speed, start speed, wear, and driver skill. Drivers will use their deck of set-up cards for this. When they are done they will have 6 cards laid out in front of them like this. One unused attribute card from your deck can be placed face down in front of these cards to show which car is yours.

You will notice that the total cost of all six set-up cards is equal to 2. Each attribute has four options represented by different set-up cards. You can mix and match these options however you want as long as the total set-up cost remains equal to 2.

You should keep your choices face down and hidden from the other drivers until everyone has selected their set-up cards. Reveal your set-up after all drivers have declared that they are ready.

For a driver’s first race it is recommended that they skip the car set-up phase. Instead you can shuffle the 1-star historical driver cards for your selected track (after removing Emerson Fittipaldi) and deal one to each rookie driver. After all non-rookies have revealed their car set-ups, rookies can look at their driver card and copy the car set-up.

Hand Out Wear

After everyone reveals their car set-ups, everyone collects their wear and skill for the race.

Multiply the number on your car’s wear set-up card by the number of laps for this race and collect that much wear. Blue chips are worth 5 wear and white chips are worth 1 wear each. Each driver should have at least 4 white wear chips in hand in order to facilitate pole bids without having to make change.

Hand Out Skill

Multiply the large number on your car’s skill set-up card by the number of laps for this race and collect that many green (-1) skill chips. You always receive as many red (-3) skill chips as indicated by the small text on your skill set-up card regardless of the number of laps.

Die Rolls and Driver Skill

Any time that a die roll is called for in Championship Formula Racing you will roll two dice and add them together. Lower results are always better.

Driver skill can be applied to any die roll made during the game. Before the dice are rolled, you may apply up to 2 green skill chips (-1) or a single red skill chip (-3) to the roll. Each green chip used will reduce the result of the roll by 1. A red skill chip reduces the result of the roll by 3. Thus, the only way to modify a roll by -3 is to use a red (-3) skill chip. You may convert a red skill chip into 3 green skill chips at any time.

Pole Bid

After drivers have chips to represent both their wear and skill, players determine the order of cars on the start grid. This is done with a blind bid of wear and skill.

Each driver takes any amount of wear and skill from what their car received for this race and place it in a closed fist over the table. When everyone is ready, all bids are revealed simultaneously. The highest bid gets the first position (or pole) on the grid, the second highest bid gets the next position on the grid, and so on. When calculating the total value of a bid, a green, -1 skill chip counts as ½ of a wear and a red, -3 skill chip counts as 1.5 wear. You may bid nothing for pole.

Ties are broken by rolling two dice. This is the only die roll in the game that you may not apply skill to. The lowest result wins the tie. Roll again as needed if the die rolls result in ties.

All wear and skill used for the bid is removed from the game.

If rookies need help picking a bid and they used a historic driver card for their set-up they can look at the top of the card where is says “use.”

If the next word is “Front” a bid near twice the number of laps would be good. If it is “Back” have them bid nothing. For anything else bid in the neighborhood of the number of laps.

Starting Grid

The start grid is composed of the 6 rows of spaces behind the start/finish line. The spaces cars can start on are marked with a bracket at the front of the space.

The arrangement of cars on the grid varies slightly depending on how many cars are participating in the race. However, the first car on the grid will always be placed at the front of the starting grid to the inside (closest to the grey bar at the side of the track). Likewise, the last car on the grid will always be placed at the end of the starting grid farthest away from the grey bar.

With up to 6 cars, fill out the grid by placing cars in an alternating pattern with each car a row behind and on the opposite side of the track as the car in front of it as shown on the right. Until the last car which goes in its usual spot.

Race Procedure

After the starting grid has been set, you are ready to race. Each turn during the race has two phases: Planning and Movement.

During the planning phase, every driver will secretly determine their desired speed for the beginning of the next move. After everyone simultaneously reveals their speeds for this turn, each car is moved in turn starting with the current leader.

All speeds and attributes relating to speeds are in MPH. When moving your car, every 20 mph will equal one space on the track. E.g., a car traveling at 80 mph will move 4 spaces.

Planning Phase

Drivers will use their deck of speed cards to keep track of how fast they went last turn as well as what speed they plan to go this turn. At the end of each turn, each driver leaves the speed card representing their speed that turn on the table in front of their car set-up cards. This is public information. If it is the first turn of the race or you spun last turn and are effectively going 0 mph, there will be no speed card in front of you.

During the planning phase, you will place a speed card for next turn face down in front of you. In the example shown below, this car went 80 mph last turn and played a card representing their speed for next turn face down on top of it. If you wish to go the same speed as last turn, use the MPS (Maintain Present Speed) card from the speed card deck.

You can increase your speed by up to your acceleration and you may decrease your speed by up to your deceleration without testing. For example, if you went 80 last turn, had a 60 acceleration, and a 60 deceleration you could go anywhere from 20 to 140 mph next turn.

Finally, you cannot go faster than your top speed without testing.

However, you can temporarily increase any of those three attributes – acceleration, deceleration, and top speed – by up to 20 mph through testing.

First Move Planning

For your first move of the game, you start at any speed between 20 and your start speed. Usually you will want to go your full start speed or you will want to test your start speed to go 20 mph faster.

Tests

Acceleration, Deceleration, Top Speed, and Start Speed attributes can be increased by a maximum of 20 mph for a turn by making a test. A test risks damaging your car in return for the temporary 20 mph increase. The result of a test is governed by a die roll and may be modified by driver skill. Note that driver skill cannot be used after a die roll is made, it must be assigned to the die roll before the roll is made.

If you plan to exceed one of your car’s attribute this turn, you should play a face down speed card that represents the speed you are attempting to go assuming your test(s) are successful.

Testing Acceleration, Top Speed, and Start Speed

When testing one of these three attributes, roll two dice and consult the table on the right.

Any green result means success. A red result indicates failure. Success means that the attribute is effectively increased by 20 mph for this turn only. For instance, if a car tests their top speed successfully this turn they would still need to test their top speed again next turn to maintain that speed.

It is possible to test both your acceleration and top speed on the same turn. When doing this, test your acceleration first. If that fails, you do not need to attempt to test your top speed (you didn’t get to that speed anyways).

For acceleration and top speed failure means that you may not exceed that attribute this turn and that particular attribute is reduced by 20 mph for the rest of the race. Note this damage by placing a -20 marker on the affected attribute card.

If a car’s top speed OR acceleration is already damaged, any subsequent damage to either acceleration or top speed causes the car’s engine to explode. The car is retired from the race. Remove the car from the track immediately, unless the car is close to the finish line.

Start Speed has some different failure results. A failure when testing start speed (a red result) causes the car to stall – the car does not move this turn -- and reduces that car’s acceleration by 20 mph for the rest of the race. Note this damage by placing a -20 marker on the acceleration attribute card.

A yellow (partial failure) result is also possible when testing start speed. A partial failure for start speed does not damage the car but does reduce the car’s start speed by 20 mph for this turn only.

Exceeding Deceleration

Deceleration can be exceeded by nearly any amount but the costs can be different.

There are effectively two ways to exceed your deceleration. You may spend wear or test your deceleration. Up to 2 wear can be used to exceed your deceleration by 20 mph per wear spent. Once per turn you can test your deceleration with dice and consult the table above. You can also combine those options. For example: you could spend 2 wear and roll dice in order to exceed your deceleration by 60 mph.

If you roll on the test table above, success effectively increases your deceleration by 20 mph for this turn. Failure means that the car’s deceleration is reduced by 20 mph for the remainder of the race and the car must spend a wear to achieve the attempted deceleration. Unlike failed acceleration and top speed tests, you do not fail to achieve extra deceleration. Note damage by placing a -20 marker on your deceleration attribute card. If the brakes had been previously damaged then the brakes explode and the car is retired from the race. Remove the car from the track immediately.

Movement Phase

Reveal Speeds

After all drivers have played a face down speed card in front of them for next turn, everyone simultaneously reveals those speeds.

Order of Movement

Cars move based on their position on the track. The car in the lead will move first and the car in the back will move last.

If two or more cars are in the same row of spaces the car with the fastest speed card showing moves first. If that speed card represents a test of acceleration or deceleration, they should resolve that attempt before we determine the order of movement.

If more than one car in the same row is starting the turn at the same speed, the car closest to the grey bar (farthest to the inside) moves first.

Spaces are considered to be in the same row when the front edge of the spaces line up. In the example on the right, the spaces with the same color are in the same row as each other.

When it is a car’s turn to move, it completes its entire move before the next car moves.

Car Movement

On its turn, each car moves 1 space for every 20 mph of its current speed. For example, a car travelling 120 mph would move 6 spaces.

Cars can move directly forward or diagonally forward. Cars may not move side-ways or backwards. The image on the right shows spaces that a car can move to with a green arrow and spaces it cannot move to with crossed, red circles.

Late Braking

After a car moves at least one space it may attempt to “late brake.” Late braking is a way to slow down after a car starts moving. This can be done for tactical reasons or it can be forced on a driver if the track ahead is blocked. If you plan to late brake during the next turn, you should play a face down card based on the speed that you will start your turn – before the planned late braking event.

Late braking is similar to exceeding your deceleration. You may spend up to 2 wear to late brake by 20 mph per wear spent. You can also late brake with dice as if testing your deceleration. You can also combine those options. For example: you could spend 2 wear and roll dice in order to late brake by 60 mph.

This gets a little more complicated if you exceeded your deceleration at the start of this move. (See additional information.)

Spaces Occupied by Other Cars

You may not end your move on a space that is occupied by another car. However, you can move through spaces occupied by other cars, but you must roll for a forced pass in order to do that (see additional information.)

Corners

For game purposes, a corner is a group of adjacent spaces with yellow backgrounds and speeds printed on them. Those speeds indicate the safe speed for that part of the corner.

Corner Speeds

When you enter a corner compare your speed to the speed of the corner space you entered. If your speed is greater than the speed of the space you will have to “pay” for your excess speed.

One wear can pay for 20 mph over the speed of a space. Two wear can pay for 40 over. Rolling a chance can pay for 20 mph. Wear and a single chance roll can be combined in different ways to pay for your excess speed but you can never roll more than one chance per corner and you can usually only spend 2 wear per corner (unless playing the optional pitting rules and using soft tires). If you want to go 60 mph over the speed of a space, you will have to spend two wear and roll a chance.

In most corners, you will pay only once per corner to exceed that corner’s speed by a given amount -- even if it takes you more than one turn to get through the corner.

If, for any reason you end up going 80 mph or more over a corner speed, you automatically crash and your car is removed from the track. You also automatically crash if you enter a corner without enough wear to pay for it. These types of crashes do not affect other drivers.

There are a couple of odd situations that can come up in relation to corners. See additional information for: Spinning in a corner, leaving a racing line before the line ends, corners that change speeds in the middle of the corner, and late braking after entering a corner are dealt with below.

When a driver is uncertain what their options are, especially when corners and possible forced passing could be involved. The race steward should feel free to lay out the choices and the potential ramifications (e.g., wear used, dice to be rolled, resulting track position).

Changing Speeds in the Middle of a Corner

If you are in the middle of a corner at the beginning of a turn, you may not normally increase your speed. However, you MAY increase your speed if you can increase your speed WITHOUT paying additional wear, rolling a chance, or automatically crashing for being 80+ over the speed of a corner space. See additional information for examples.

The Last Space of a Corner

As a point of clarification, because you deal with speeds in corners when you enter corner spaces, if you end a move on the last space of a corner you have effectively cleared the corner. You will not enter another space in that corner when you move next turn so your move is not restricted by the corner you are leaving.

Racing Lines

Many corners have red lines running through them. Some corners have more than one line and a few have green lines. These racing lines and are the fastest ways through a corner. A car using a red racing line treats all corner spaces it enters as if the corner speeds were 20 mph higher. However, racing lines require the car follow the entire line from the first space to the last in order to gain that advantage.

Spaces with lines in them but no speeds or yellow backgrounds are not corner spaces. You do not have to deal with corner speeds until you enter a corner space, even if you start using a line prior to a corner. Some tracks have green racing lines. A car using a green racing line treats all corner spaces it enters as if the corner speeds were 40 mph higher.

Chances, Spins, and Crashes

The possible results of a chance roll are shown on the right. Green results mean that the chance was a success. A yellow result means that the car has spun out. A red result indicates that the car has crashed.

Spins

A spun car stops in the first space that required the chance roll and changes its current speed is to 0. A 0 speed is usually shown by picking up all speed cards in front of the car’s set-up. A spin can also be indicated by turning the spun car backwards on the track.

Next turn, the spun car will plot the slower of its acceleration and start speed and may not test these attributes this turn. For example, a spun car with an acceleration of 40 and a start speed of 60 would go 40 next turn – the lower of those two attributes. The car can only go slower than this if the corner spaces it navigates requires it to do so.

A spun car will also move last among any cars in its row regardless of their speeds and track position.

A spun car may not continue to use a racing line it spun on but may use any upcoming racing lines, even in the same corner. A spun car may not exceed the speed of the corner it spun in.

Crashes

Note the space the crash occurred in and place the car upside-down and next to the track. This car is out of the race. For the remainder of this turn if any other cars reach or pass the row that this crash occurred in, they may become involved in the crash. See additional information for details on crash involvement.

Slipstreaming

If the car directly in front of you this turn starts their move at 120 mph or more and does not start their move on a corner space, then you may be able to gain extra spaces from a slipstream (or slip for short). If you are going faster than the car you are trying to slip or if you were going 0 mph last turn (either because it is the start of the race, you spun, or any other reason) you cannot gain a slip this turn.

A slip normally gives the trailing car an optional extra space of movement. If the car in front went 180 mph or faster, then the trailing car may gain up to 2 extra spaces of movement.

The spaces gained from a slip are optional and that the trailing car does not need to decide if they want the spaces until they move. For example a car that gained a slip from a car that went 180 this turn could chose to gain 0, 1, or 2 extra spaces.

Spaces gained from a slip do not change the speed of the car. This is especially important if a car carries a slip into a corner. However, if a car with a slip attempts a forced pass and fails, it cannot “take back” the slip spaces and must still late brake at least 40 mph as a result of the failed pass.

The Race Finish

The race is over when a car reaches or crosses the finish line at the end of the pre-determined number of laps. Cars that end their move in the row of spaces immedately before the start-finish line are considered to have finished the race. On that turn, the car that moves the farthest past the finish line is the winner. Ties go to the car that ended up closest to the grey shaded side of the track. The order in which cars cross the line that turn is not important other then as it may allow them to gain the grey-shaded side of the track.

Additional Set-Up Information

Car Set-Up Cards by Attribute and Point Value

-1012
Acceleration20406080
Deceleration20406080
Top Speed140160180200
Start Speed2060100120
Wear5 x laps6 x laps7 x laps8 x laps
Driver Skill2 x laps green (-1) chips, and 0 red (-3) chips3 x laps green (-1) chips, and 1 red (-3) chips4 x laps green (-1) chips, and 2 red (-3) chips5 x laps green (-1) chips, and 3 red (-3) chips

Acceleration

Acceleration limits how much you can increase your speed from one turn to the next without testing. Acceleration may also limit how fast you can go the turn after a spin.

Start Speed

Start Speed is the maximum speed you can go on the first turn of the race without testing. Start Speed may also limit how fast you can go the turn after a spin.

Wear

Wear is a consumable resources that represents your tires. Wear points can be used to go through corners faster and can also be used to safely exceed your deceleration. Details for using wear are covered later.

The amount of wear you receive at the beginning of a race is equal to the number on your selected wear attribute card times the number of laps that the race will go.

For example, if your car has the 7 x laps option and your race will be 3 laps, then you will start the race with 21 wear. Note that this car has access to all of its wear from the start of the race. In this example. you would not be limited to spending only 7 wear in each lap. You could spend 21 wear or 0 wear in the first lap or any amount in between.

Every time you use wear it is discarded to the box. Unless you are using the optional pitting rules, there is no way to gain more wear during the race.

Driver Skill

Driver Skill is a consumable resources that represents your driver’s ability to get the most out of their car. Driver Skill points can be used to make any die roll safer.

There are two denominations of skill chips: green (-1) and red (-3). The amount of red (-3) skill chips you get at the beginning of a race is a set amount (specified in smaller text on your skill attribute card) regardless of the number of laps this race will be. The amount of green (-1) skill ships you get at the beginning of a race is equal to the number indicated on your skill attribute card times the number of laps that the race will go. For example, if your car has the 3 x laps option and your race will be 3 laps, then you will start the race with 9, 1-skill chips plus 1, 3-skill chip. As with wear, you have access to all of that skill from the start of the race and may spend all of it or none in any given lap or any amount in between.

Every time you use skill it is discarded to the box. There is no way to gain more skill during the race.

Additional Pole Bid Information

Starting Grids for more than 6 cars

When there are between 7 and 12 cars in the race the blue spaces are all used and some number of red spaces will also be used, from front to back, as shown by the numbers on the picture below. So in a 9 car field, we would use all of the blue spaces plus the first three red spaces (marked “w/ 7+”, “w/ 8+”, and “w/ 9+”).

Cars are assigned to those spaces from front to back and from inside to outside. As always, the first car will be placed in the front row to the inside. The second car would be placed in the front row to the outside, etc. If a space is not being used for that number of cars, then it is skipped. Thus the last car will always be in the last row to the outside. The example below shows a 9 car field and indicates the order in which cars would be placed in each space.

The purpose of this layout is to balance out the effect of pole bids regardless of how many cars are in the field.

Additional Planning Phase Information

Planning Errors

If a driver is attempting to go a speed higher than they can achieve even if they test their acceleration and/or top speed, their speed should be reduced to the highest speed they could reach if they successfully test their acceleration and/or top speed.

If a driver somehow did not play a face down card representing their speed for this turn, they should be considered to have played a Maintain Present Speed card. However, every effort should be taken to prevent this from happening.

Clarification to your speed after failing a top speed or acceleration test

If you fail a test of acceleration or top speed or both your speed this turn will be 20 mph less than your attempted speed. For example, if you were testing your 160 top speed in order to go 180 and fail the test, you will reset your displayed speed to 160 this turn even though 160 is now more than your new, damaged top speed of 140.

However, in this example, if you attempt to stay at 160 next turn you will have to test your top speed again and risk a second engine damage which would remove the car from the race.

Exceeding deceleration examples

If your deceleration was 40 and your current speed was 140 then you could go as slow as 100 without testing or spending wear. You could slow to 80 by spending a wear or testing your deceleration. You could slow to 60 by spending two wear or spending one wear and testing your deceleration. You could slow to 40 by spending two wear and testing your deceleration.

Exceeding deceleration by 80 or more

If for some reason, a car is forced to exceed their deceleration by 80 or more mph, the car should spend 3 wear, roll to test their deceleration, and then spin regardless of the result of the die roll. Also, if a car is required to spend wear to decelerate but does not have enough wear to spend, the car spins automatically. This can happen if a car does not have wear and fails a deceleration test.

Additional Movement Phase Information

Car Movement Examples Care Movement Examples When Rows and Lanes do not Line Up

Below are some examples of a car’s movement options when spaces don’t line up cleanly.

On the far left we see a typical 3-wide straight and the blue car’s available options.

The next two images across show different things that can happen when a track narrows from 3-wide to 2-wide. The second image from the left show that the blue car only has one space it can move to. It just can’t reach the inside, 60 space in the corner ahead. The middle image shows that the blue car can enter either the 80 or 60 space as it enters the corner.

The last two images above show a couple situations that come up when rows do not line up. This happens most often in the middle of corners, but can happen outside corners. You may only move diagonally when the front edge of the space you are leaving and the back edge of the space you are moving into line up. In the second image from the right, the blue car cannot move into the inside, 60 space in the corner. In the far right image, the blue car can change lanes. A visual trick to determine if you can change lanes is to look for the “+”. When spaces line up to allow a lane change their corners line up to form a “+” otherwise you get “T”s instead.

Late Braking After Exceeding Deceleration

If you exceed your deceleration at the beginning of a move, it impacts your choices later in the move if you chose to late brake.

If you rolled dice to exceed deceleration at the beginning of the turn, you cannot roll dice to late brake later during the same move.

If you spent any wear to exceed deceleration at the start of this turn that reduces how much wear you can spend to late brake. If you spent 1 wear to exceed deceleration at the start of the turn, then you can only spend 1 wear to late bake that same turn. If you already spent 2 wear to exceed your deceleration this turn, you may not spend wear to late brake.

Forced Passing

When attempting to move through a space occupied by another car, the car that is moving through the blocked space is called the attacker and the car that currently occupying that space is called the defender. Before the attacker rolls dice on the table on the right, the defender has to decide whether they are going to attempt to block the pass attempt. If the defender is currently going 0 mph (possibly because of a spin) then the defender cannot block. Blocking makes the die roll more difficult but also introduces the possibility that the cars could collide and one or both could lose wear.

After the defender declares whether a block will be attempted, the attacker must decide how much if any skill to apply to this die roll and then make the roll.

A green result means that the car has moved through the occupied space and may continue moving if possible.

A red result means that the attacker must stop in the last space it occupied prior to the forced pass attempt. The attacker is done moving this turn. The attacker must also reduce its current speed to reflect the number of spaces it did move this turn. So if the attacker moved 3 spaces before attempting a forced pass, the attacker must reduce its speed to 60. This will require late braking.

However, if the attacker used spaces gained from slips in order to make a pass possible, the attacker will need to slow to a speed minus the spaces it gained from the slip. For example, if the attacker moved 5 spaces before the pass attempt, but took 1 slip as part of its attempted move, then the attacker would have to slow to 80 (4 spaces plus the 1 slip space). If the defender chose to block, then there is the possibility that there was contact between the cars. After the result is determined, look at each of the two dice rolled. For every “3” showing on these two dice, the defender losses a wear. For every “4” showing on these two dice, the attacker losses a wear. This penalty occurs regardless of the result of the pass.

If a car that has no wear left is asked to pay wear after a forced pass, that car spins.

Forced Passing in a Corner

The attacker in a forced pass may not use a racing line through a corner. A defender that is using a racing line may continue to use the racing line regardless of whether a block was declared.

Note that the unless the forced pass is a success the attacker in a forced pass does not enter the space that the defender occupies, or any of the spaces after. From a timing perspective, a driver must deal with any corner spaces he enters before a forced pass first, then deal with the forced pass, then deal with the space the defender occupies and any spaces after that.

Consecutive Forced Passes

Although very unlikely to occur, it is possible to make multiple forced pass attempts on the same move. However, that can lead to a situation where the last space a car occupied prior to a failed forced pass attempt is occupied by another car. If that were to occur, place the attacker in any empty space in the same row. If there are no unoccupied spaces in that row, move the attacker back another row until an empty space is found (preferably one that the attacker moved through) and reduce the attackers speed another 20 mph for every additional row moved. See late braking for instructions on slowing down in the middle of a move.

Odd Corner Examples

In the section of Monaco shown below at left, there are two corners. The first corner being composed of an 80 space, two 60 spaces, and a 40 space. Then there is a row of white spaces that separates Mirabeau from the hairpin – which contains a 20 space and two 40 spaces.

In the middle example above from Spa, the Bus Stop Chicane is considered one corner. Even though the corner switches from right to left and even includes two sequential arrows it is still composed of a single group of adjacent spaces with a yellow background and speeds printed on them.

The final example on the right above shows a section of the infield from Circuit of the America’s that is not a corner despite perhaps looking like one – no yellow backgrounds and no speeds.

Changing Radius Corners

In most corners, the speeds in each lane of the corner are the same and it is often impossible to change lanes once inside the corner. However, in some corners speeds may change in the middle of a lane or it may be possible to move to a lane with a different corner speed.

Remember that when you first enter a corner and pay wear and/or roll a chance you are effectively paying for the ability to take this corner at some amount over the speed of the spaces: usually +20 mph, +40 mph, or +60 mph more than the spaces would normally allow.

If the speed of the spaces you enter increases then you may be able to increase your speed next turn without having to pay more wear or roll a chance. Because there is no way to increase your speed in the middle of moving your car, the only way to take advantage of this would be if you end your move in the middle of a corner.

In the Luffield corner at Silverstone shown on the left, you can see that the last space of each lane is 20 mph faster than the other spaces in that lane. If a car started its turn right in front of the corner, it likely would not make a difference. A car taking the outside lane at 100 would have to pay a wear or roll a chance through the 80 spaces and would end up a space outside the corner with the 100 space at the end of the lane not affecting them at all. However, a car that started further back and entered the inside lane at 100 might pay 2 wear into the 60 space in that lane at the end of its move. On that car’s next turn, it could legally go 120 without rolling a chance because it had already paid for +40 mph in this corner at 80 + 40 is 120. If a car entered the 80 at 100 and paid 1 wear and ended its move that turn in that first 80 space it would have to remain at 100 next turn because the first space it entered next turn would still be an 80 space – and 80 +20 is still 100.

If the speed of the corner spaces drop then you will have to pay more wear or roll a chance or decelerate.

In the corner from Nürbergring on the left you can see that not only do the speeds change in the middle of the corner but you can change lanes in the middle of the corner as well.

If a car started their move right before this corner at 100, it would have two main choices: take the 100 lane all the way through the corner for no cost or start in the 100 space, then move over through the 80 space. Once the car moved into the 80 space it would have to pay a wear or roll a chance. If, for some reason, a car entered the corner at 120 it could take the 100s for a wear all the way through the corner or take the first 100 for a wear and then enter the 80 space for an additional wear or a chance. If the car entered the corner at 120 it might also take the 120s at no cost. If the car ended its move in that last 120 space, it would have a couple choices next turn: it could remain at 120 and spend either 1 wear through the 100s or 2 wear through the 80s, or it could slow to 100 and take the 100s for free or the 80 for 1 wear… etc.

Late Braking After Entering a Corner

If a car late brakes after entering a corner they may lose some or all of the advantage they may have “bought” with wear or skill earlier in the corner. For the purpose of determining how fast the car can go in the same corner next turn, pretend that the car entered the corner at its new speed, after the late brake.

Leaving a Racing Line before Its End

If you leave a racing line without completing it, you must retroactively pay for the corner as if you had not used the line. For example you could pay an additional wear if you have not already spent 2 wear in this corner or you could roll a chance. If you have already spent as much wear as you can in this corner and have already rolled a chance, then leaving a line would result in automatically crashing without impacting other drivers. Note that leaving a line before entering a corner carries no penalty at all.

If the result of a chance roll made after leaving a line before it ends results in a spin or a crash, that result occurs in the last space that the car was still on the line.

Leaving a green racing line before the line ends also requires you to retroactively pay for the corner as if you had not used the line.

Crash Involvement

When a car does reach or pass that row, it must roll a chance with the following modifiers in addition to any skill they spend on that roll.

If the car’s move would be completed 0-2 spaces past the crash row subtract 2 from the chance roll, otherwise subtract 1 from the chance roll. Also, if the crash row is a three-wide section of track subtract an additional 1 from the chance roll. Any spins or crashes that might occur as a result of this chance roll take place in the space where that car reached or passed the crash row, not at the end of the car’s move for the turn.

If a car reaches or passes more than one crash, it will have to roll a chance to avoid each one separately.

One Car Slipstreaming Two & Two Cars Slipping One

There are times when a car could slip either of two different cars. On the left you can see that the silver/black car could slip either the blue car or the red car as he exits the Club corner in the modern configuration of Silverstone. The silver/black car can make that decision when it is their turn to move.

There also can be times when two cars could slip the same car in front of them. In this case, only one car may take the slip.

On the left, you can see that this time through Club both the red and blue cars are behind the silver/black car. Assuming both cars could otherwise take a slip from the silver/black car, the first car to do so gets the slip and prevents the other car from getting a slip.

For instance, if the red car moved before the blue car but either could not take the slip because it was going faster then the silver/black car or decided not to take the slip space then the blue car would still have that option. However, if the red car moved first and took the slip, then the blue car would not be able to.

Race Finish, Spins, and Crashes

Cars that crash the turn they finish the race are considered to have not finished the race. Cars that spin the turn they finish the race are considered to have finished last among other cars that finished the race that turn.

If cars enter a corner after finishing the race, they must deal with the speed of that corner as they normally would.

On the left, we see a dramatic race finish at Silverstone. The red car finishes first. The silver/black and green/yellow cars have their nose on the line. Silver/black is closer to the grey shaded side of the track and so finishes 2nd. Green/yellow gets 3rd. The blue car went farther past the line but spun and will finish 4th. The black/red car in the back did not finish the race this turn.

What if I break my engine close to the end of the race?

If a car suffers engine failure (damaging the top speed or acceleration after having damaged either the top speed or acceleration previous this race) within sight of the start-finish line, the car is not immediately removed from the track but is instead given a speed equal to half their speed after failing the test (round down) and then moved. If the car crosses the finish line this turn then it is considered to have finished the race. Otherwise, the car is removed from the track.

Lucid Phoenix Games